Skip to content

How It Ends

Begin with the end in mind.

[Stephen Covey]

You might be wondering why a film review would start off with a mantra often given to business majors, but I assure you the answer is quite simple: it seems that the writers had never heard of this concept before. This is especially ironic as the main character, Will (Theo James), is asked multiple times within the first fifteen minutes if he has a plan! It might have seemed a good idea at the time of the script’s initial writing, but it still begs the question of how no solid ending was dreamed up through the rest of production. An excuse of an explanation for the whole premise of the film would have been more satisfying than having the main characters trying to outrun a cloud of what could be just about anything to fit the two main theories pitched to Will throughout the course of the story.

This really is a perfect example of how important an ending is. I started watching this with exceptionally low expectations, thinking that this was an attempt to relive the “better” days of disaster movies. Instead, the film opens with a wholly unlikable professional millennial dead-set on marrying his now pregnant girlfriend, Sam (Kat Graham) . . . despite the fact that her father, Tom (Forest Whitaker), can’t stand Will. Even though that premise is as generic as corn flakes, the story progresses in such a manner that you actually come to respect and somewhat admire Will through his growth, and the same can be said for Tom. The characters in this film actually had a vague semblance of personal depth, and the acting of both characters was exceptionally well done considering the material.

Since the film is in essence a disaster movie, it would be expected that the “disaster” in question would have some sort of concrete explanation, especially since the disaster is what puts the whole plot in motion. Of course, as alluded to at the beginning of this review, the speculative “explanations” of the overarching disaster vary from a super volcano erupting, to the start of WWIII and a thousand years of nuclear winter. The plot itself is interesting since the whole story takes place over the course of a week, where somehow all of civilization breaks down to resemble The Purge by the end of the film. The cynic in me thought it could be quite likely, but perhaps nobody really knows how civilization would “realistically” dissolve in the event of an impending apocalypse.

To summarize, don’t waste your time with How It Ends. Sure, it comes with your Netflix subscription, and it does have at least one good actor (two, if you count Theo James), but those two facts don’t excuse Netflix’s acquisition strategy of throwing cash at whatever seems new and “edgy” at the film festivals. The frequency of bad films going straight to Netflix is starting to give “Netflix Originals” the same clout as “Direct to Home Video” releases, and I can’t help but wonder what Netflix as a company is thinking by investing in so many bad films…speaking of “beginning with the end in mind”.

RATING: D-

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow us on Instagram

FILM 20: And we’re done. #RagingBull is our final film through #TheSeventies. Our favorites: “Five Easy Pieces,” “Carnal Knowledge,” “Sunday Bloody Sunday,” “The Last Picture Show,” “Cries & Whispers,” “Sorcerer,” and “3 Women.” All #films watched available at #the_education_of_gortnacul. Now, we begin our #FrightFest a.k.a. Gortnacul Does #Halloween in 2018! We’ve got some rare modern gems from around the globe we hope will be worthwhile. Stay tuned.
#Sundance has shared their new trailer for #Jonestown: “Terror in the Jungle,” a two-night, four-part docuseries about #JimJones, the #cult leader who orchestrated the #deaths of over 900 people in 1978. The #docuseries, co-produced by #LeonardoDiCaprio, mixes archival footage with stirring recreations of life at the Guyana-based #Peoples #Temple, as well as unreleased recordings and new interviews with those who witnessed Jones prior to the “revolutionary suicide.” [SOURCE: @rollingstone]
AN EMERGING TREND. ‪#OliverStone: “frankly, I probably couldn’t do films like I used to do because the climate has changed.” ‪#SteveCarrel: ”It might be impossible to do [The Office] today and have people accept it the way it was accepted 10 years ago. The climate's different.” #TheOffice #W #comedy #politicalcorrectness #groupthink #outrage #SJWs #diversity #tribalism #politics #climatechange #hollywood #pc
“#First Man—#chronologically situated between 1983’s The Right Stuff and 1995’s #Apollo 13—fills a niche in #Hollywood’s canon of #space #exploration films. It follows Neil Armstrong (#RyanGosling) through the early years of #America’s space program all the way to his fateful #Apollo 11 mission in 1969. We travel alongside Armstrong through his early #flights in supersonic jets on the very edges of #Earth’s atmosphere, the first successful docking of a #spacecraft in #orbit, and, of course, the #moon landing itself.” [SOURCE: https://www.theamericanconservative.com]
%d bloggers like this: